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More Interview Questions and Answers

How would you describe your current employer?

Alternative and related questions:

What do you think of your current employer?
What is your relationship like with your current employer?

The meaning behind the question:

The interviewer is unlikely to be too interested in your current employer.  What they're truffling for with this question is what your relationship is like with your current employer and, yet again, to better understand your motivations in wishing to leave them.

Your answer:

We've previously covered the question, "How would you describe your current boss?"  Don't make the mistake of thinking this question is the same.  They're specifically asking about your employer as a whole, not just your immediate boss.  However, my guidelines for answering the question are very similar.  Give a short but reasonably complimentary description and, most importantly, portray yourself as a valued member of staff.

Avoid any overt negativity because, ultimately, it will reflect negatively on you.  No disparaging comments; you don't want to open up a can of worms here.  But, likewise, don't overly sing their praises because it may just ring hollow.  After all, if they're that great, then why do you want to leave?!  A decent compromise is to drop in a mild criticism which is simultaneously complimentary of your potential new employer.

Example:

I have no complaints.  I'm happy with the way they operate and with the way they treat me and the way they treat their staff in general.  They're good employers.  They've taught me a lot; I've gained a lot of experience and I feel appreciated by them for the results I achieve and, generally, as a member of their team.  I do feel that they're perhaps not as fast-moving and progressive as they could be which is probably my main reason for wishing to move on and join an organization such as yours.

Word of warning:

I've seen another expert suggest you could just answer 'Very good' and leave it at that.  However, I'd advise against this (a) because it makes you look uncommunicative and (b) even worse it can make it look like you don't want to give a proper answer to the question, possibly because you have something to hide.



The Interview Question & Answer Book

The Interview Question and Answer Book

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More interview questions and answers

 

Talking about your current employment

Talking about this vacancy

Understanding your career path, plans and ambitions

Addressing problems in your career history

Coping with stress and pressure

Defining teamwork

Management and leadership

Personal and professional development

Interests and activities

The amateur psychiatrist

Money, money, money

Health

Relocation

Deal-making

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